Octagon fireworks

consulting on

kerbside rubbish and recycling collection

Currently, the DCC provides a kerbside collection for rubbish and recycling in urban areas and rural townships. We’re looking at changes to this service because we want to encourage more recycling and less waste. We’re also getting rid of DCC black plastic rubbish bags.

In March/April last year, we asked you what you thought about ideas for a future kerbside collection service. Based on community feedback, and a Ministry for the Environment report recommending standardised kerbside collections across the country, we are asking what you think about two options for the future. With both options, we would replace the black rubbish bag with a red-lidded wheelie bin, keep the existing blue crate for glass and keep the yellow-lidded wheelie bin for mixed recycling.

Separating out food waste from green waste would provide better options for processing and reusing the materials. Food waste should be reduced as people become more aware of how much food they are throwing away. Taking food and green waste out of our landfill will also help us reduce our carbon emissions.

Four bins plus one

  • Keep blue crate for glass and yellow-lidded recycling bin
  • Replace the current black rubbish bag with a red-lidded wheelie bin
  • Separate food bin
  • Optional green waste bin paid for separately

Cost:

Estimated rates in the first year of the new service.

Four bins: $270 – $310

Optional garden waste bin (additional cost): $140 – $180

KEEP THESE

Blue bin 45 litre

Fortnightly
glass recycling

Yellow bin 8-240 litre

Fortnightly
mixed recycling

PLUS NEW

Red bin 80-140 litre

Fortnightly
general waste

Green bin 23 litre

Weekly
food waste

NEW optional

Green bin 240 litre

Fortnightly
garden waste

Three bins

  • Keep blue crate for glass and yellow-lidded recycling bin
  • Replace the current black rubbish bag with a red-lidded wheelie bin

KEEP THESE

Blue bin 45 litre

Fortnightly glass
recycling

Yellow bin 8-240 litre

Fortnightly mixed
recycling

PLUS NEW

Red bin 80-140 litre

Weekly
general waste

Cost:

Estimated rates in the first year of the new service.

$260 – $300

te nuku i te tō tātou tāone

moving around our city

We want to make sure people can get around the city as safely and easily as possible.

It’s good news that our population is growing and that some big projects, such as the new hospital, are planned for the city, but this will have an impact on how we get around. We’re doing our best to co-ordinate projects so they happen in the right order and we keep things moving as well as we can. Construction of the new Dunedin Hospital is expected to start next year. Since 2018, we’ve been working with Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency and the Otago Regional Council on the best ways for people to get around the city during, and after, the hospital construction. This package of work is called the Shaping Future Dunedin Transport (SFDT) programme.

Our key aims are improving public transport, creating good alternative routes and providing clear information so we have an accessible city while the hospital is being built and afterwards.

As part of the SFDT programme, the DCC is proposing to carry out six projects totalling just over $50 million – some of the projects are partly funded by Waka Kotahi. For each project, our share of the capital costs would be funded by debt.

The ongoing costs that are paid for by rates include interest, depreciation and maintenance.

The proposed six projects:

Harbour Arterial Improvements icon

Harbour arterial improvements

$16.6 million

(our share is $8.1 million)

Completion of the harbour arterial route so traffic has an alternative route which bypasses the central city. This route will be particularly useful to divert heavy vehicles from the city centre.

When finished, the harbour arterial will run along Frederick, Ward, Thomas Burns and Wharf Streets.

There will also be real-time signs showing motorists the quickest routes to take around the city.

When finished in 2026-27, $900,000 ongoing costs each year, paid by rates.

Mosgiel Pool icon

Central city parking management

$11 million

(we pay the full cost)

We know people are concerned about the availability of parking in the city centre and around the new hospital. We plan to improve the way we manage parking by:

  • providing ways to help motorists find a parking spot, e.g. electronic signs showing where and how many parks are available across the city
  • improving technology to make it easier to manage parking
  • extending paid parking areas in the central city.

When finished in 2025-26, $800,000 ongoing costs each year, paid by rates.

Park & Ride icon

Park and ride facilities at Mosgiel and Burnside

$10.3 million

(our share is $5 million)

Most of the car trips (65%) into the city are made by people coming from the south. We want to provide parking so people from areas such as Mosgiel and Burnside can leave their cars and take an express bus into the city. This would reduce traffic congestion in the city, particularly at peak times.

When finished in 2028-29, $500,000 ongoing costs each year, paid by rates.

Princes Street Bus Lane icon

Princes Street bus lane

$6.6 million

(our share is $3.2 million)

Princes Street is a busy road for commuters and has a high road safety risk. The aim of this proposed project is to provide a separate bus lane along Princes Street, from South Road to Manse Street and then to Moray Place, so bus trips would be faster, encouraging more people to take public transport. We plan to install pedestrian crossings along Princes Street connecting each side of the road and providing good access to bus stops. We also want to make improvements so it’s safer and easier for people who want to walk and cycle into the city from the south.

When finished in 2023-24, $300,000 ongoing costs each year, paid by rates.

Central Cycle & Pedestrian icon

Central cycle and pedestrian improvements

$5 million

(our share is $2.4 million)

We plan to fill gaps in the central cycle network by providing cycleways in St Andrew, Bank/George and Albany Streets.

As the cycleway network has been completed on the harbour side, there would then be a direct link from the harbour to the city centre via the University of Otago. We will also be improving the footpaths in these areas to make it safer to walk along this route.

We propose putting in more Barnes Dance crossings to make it easier to access the new hospital.

When finished in 2025-26, $300,000 ongoing costs each year, paid by rates.

Central City Bike Hub Icon

Central city bike hubs – parking and facilities

$2.5 million

(our share is $1.2 million)

Currently, the central city doesn’t have much secure and sheltered bike parking. We hope to encourage more people to cycle by installing hubs where bikes can be securely stored. The hubs, which would be in North Dunedin, the central city and South Dunedin/the Oval, would also have repair and charging services.

When finished in 2026-27, $100,000 ongoing costs each year, paid by rates.

Our role as landlord icon

our role as landlord

DCC community housing

The DCC is the largest landlord for community housing in the city, with about 940 units. We want to hear from you about what direction we take with our housing.

DCC community housing is meant to break even, but in reality it costs us more to run and maintain the units than we get from rents. This means some rates funding is used to provide the service. We want to know if the DCC should aim to provide community housing at no cost to ratepayers. This would mean putting up rents for community housing tenants. Our rents are low compared with other centres and market rents.

Do you support rates being used to subsidise rents for the DCC’s community housing?

While we continue to replace and upgrade existing units, we haven’t built any new ones since 2010. We think it’s time to develop some new community housing and we want your feedback on two options. Our preferred option is to spend $1 million a year for the next 10 years, and this is what we’ve included in the draft budget. $1 million will get us four new housing units each year. The other option is to spend double this – $20 million over 10 years.

That the DCC spends $10 million to build more community housing units

$10 million

capital cost paid for by debt

$2 million

from rates (in total over the 10 years)*

This means an average homeowner would pay about $30 more in rates (in total over the 10 years)*

That the DCC spends $20 million to build more community housing units

$20 million

capital cost paid for by debt

$4 million

from rates (in total over the 10 years)*

This means an average homeowner would pay about $60 more in rates (in total over the 10 years)*

*If rates continue to subsidise rents

At the moment, priority for our houses is given to people aged 55 and over. This age limit was decided when the demand for housing was lower. Now we have a larger waiting list, we are considering giving priority to people aged 65 and over. Most of our current tenants are in the 65+ age group and the number of people in that age category is projected to rise over the next 20 years.

Do you support the DCC prioritising its community housing for people aged 65 and over?

Performing arts venue icon

performing arts venue

Dunedin does not have a flexible, mid-sized auditorium of 350 – 450 seats. After discussion with mana whenua, the arts sector and funding organisations, we’re asking the community about two options, the Athenaeum in the Octagon and the Mayfair Theatre in South Dunedin. Neither site is currently owned or operated by the DCC. The Athenaeum would be a partnership project with developer Zeal Land Ltd. The Mayfair Theatre option would mean redeveloping the existing theatre, which is owned by the Mayfair Theatre Charitable Trust but could possibly be bought by the DCC.

The Council’s preferred option is the Athenaeum. Developing a theatre there would support our plan to develop the wider Octagon area into a creative precinct. The Athenaeum is also close to restaurants and bars, and the bus hub. If this option is chosen, we expect the venue would open in 2027-28.

Redeveloping the Mayfair Theatre would support our efforts to regenerate South Dunedin and would be a boost for businesses in the area. If this option is chosen, we expect the venue would open in 2026-27.

The Athenaeum

$17.1 million

capital cost, paid by debt

$4.6 million

ongoing costs each year, paid by rates, once the venue is open. This means an average homeowner would pay about $65 more in rates each year.

The Mayfair Theatre

$31.2 million

$31.2 million capital cost, paid by debt

$3.7 million

ongoing costs each year, paid by rates, once the venue is open. This means an average homeowner would pay about $50 more in rates each year.

Public toilet icon

public toilets

We’re planning to spend $3.2 million over the next 10 years to improve 65 existing public toilets, build a new Changing Places bathroom and put in two new toilets a year from 2022-23.

Where do you think the new public toilets should go?

A Changing Places bathroom is a place where people with multiple or complex disabilities can get changed in a safe, clean environment. It has toilet, shower and change facilities for adults or children, and their caregivers.

As well as the Changing Places bathroom we’re planning to build in the central city in 2021-22, one will also be included in the new South Dunedin Library and Community Complex.

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